Posts

Umpqua Watersheds Blog

Restoration

Winter 2018

Published December 6th, 2018

Stanley Petrowski

Umpqua Watersheds has participated in numerous forest collaboratives over the last decade and a half that have served several purposes. Our fundamental purpose is to “restore the rest.” From its inception UW has held restoration ecology as a fundamental principle guiding our desire to find some modicum of common ground for watershed management. [...]

Continue Reading


Fall 2018

Published September 7th, 2018

Stanley Petrowski

A River Dying?

It’s been a difficult summer for the anadromous fish of the Umpqua Rivers. The river was so hot that the Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, to their credit, shut down much of the angling of the basin. Even the notoriously beautiful cooler waters of the North Umpqua were restricted [...]

Continue Reading


Summer 2018

Published June 7th, 2018

Stanley Petrowski

Restoration in the Age of Ecological Chaos

I am often challenged during agency and non-agency interactions regarding the efficacy of restoration work. Anyone even remotely aware of what it costs to conduct ecological restoration knows that the costs are exorbitant. The questioning of restoration efforts has caused me to take pause for evaluation. [...]

Continue Reading


Spring 2018

Published March 7th, 2018

Stanley Petrowski

 

No Water – No Life

It is obvious that water is one of the most critically important elements of creation. It is not so obvious that it is one of the most threatened elements that restoration ecologists and enthusiasts see on the horizon. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the challenges facing our culture [...]

Continue Reading


Winter 2017

Published December 7th, 2017

Stanley Petrowski

Something Fishy Going on Here

 

This is the first time I have written two restoration committee articles in one of the 100 Valleys newsletters. This topic is so critically important that I felt it necessitated special attention.

Recently Umpqua Watersheds held its annual strategic planning session for the Board of Directors. During [...]

Continue Reading


Winter 2017

Published December 5th, 2017

Stanley Petrowski

Regaining Some of What Has Been Lost

 

Beginning in 2012 (I know, that seems like a long time ago), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began its process of developing the latest version of the Oregon Coastal Multi-species Conservation and Management Plan. It took two years to come to the [...]

Continue Reading


Fall 2017

Published September 7th, 2017

Stanley Petrowski

Restoring Vital Signs

 

As a young man newly 20 years of age and just home from the war in Vietnam, I hit bottom. It wasn’t a pleasant experience because it was full of terror and lifelessness. From that bleak place, a slow but steady emergence began – and a healing, though gradual, [...]

Continue Reading


Fall 2017

Published September 6th, 2017

Stanley Petrowski

Restoring Vital Signs

 

As a young man newly 20 years of age and just home from the war in Vietnam, I hit bottom. It wasn’t a pleasant experience because it was full of terror and lifelessness. From that bleak place, a slow but steady emergence began – and a healing, though gradual, [...]

Continue Reading


Spring 2017

Published March 8th, 2017

Stanley Petrowski

SUCTION DREDGE MINING BILL PASSED!

Thank you to everyone who spoke out to stop environmentally damaging suction dredge mining! After receiving bipartisan support, Senate Bill 3A was recently signed by Gov. Brown, providing immediate protection to some of Oregon’s most sensitive waterways.

Suction dredge mining is a form of recreational gold mining that [...]

Continue Reading


Spring 2017

Published March 7th, 2017

Stan Petrowski

The Burden of Healing

From its very beginnings Umpqua Watersheds has had restoration ecology as a critical component of its agenda. The first decade or so was mainly devoted to the immediate and most important task. Slowing down of the level of damage to the habitat that was being reeked on the public [...]

Continue Reading


  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
error

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)